NIACE examines main party proposals for learning and skills

15th April 2015

NIACE ‘s manifesto – Skills for Prosperity, launched in June last year – detailed 6 priority actions for the next Government. As the main political parties for this year’s General Election launch their manifestos, NIACE’s senior team reflect on the proposals for learning skills and highlight what’s missing.

What’s in the Labour manifesto for employment, learning and skills? David Hughes, Chief Executive of NIACE, highlights the ‘good hooks’ in the Labour Party Manifesto for NIACE to ‘get stuck into’ aswell as the missed opportunities.

Can the Greens deliver ‘the Common Good?’ Steve Mulligan, Assistant Director for Policy and Public Affairs, praises the Green Party for their clear commitment to lifelong learning but questions whether they have been too ambitious.

The Conservative manifesto: jobs, skills and growth. Stephen Evans, NIACE Deputy Chief Executive, believes that a Right to Train is as important as the flagship Right to Buy policy from the Conservative Party.

A serious migration – reacting to the UKIP manifesto. Tom Stannard, NIACE Deputy Chief Executive, discusses why the UKIP manifesto remains too heavy in emphasis on the needs of young people alone and ignores the needs of the working age population.

It’s Education, Education, Education for the LibDems.  Dave Simmonds, the Chief Executive of the Centre for Economic & Social Inclusion, takes a look at the series of ‘sensible and welcome commitments and proposals’ in the Liberal Democrat Manifesto.

Learning and skills will work for Wales and strengthen Scotland. Aaron Hill, Policy & Public Affairs Officer at NIACE Cymru discusses the Plaid Cymru and the SNP manifestos and examines their proposals for learning and skills.

The opportunities we need to seize. David Hughes, Chief Executive of NIACE, offers an overview of all of the General Election manifestos and the learning and skills opportunities they present.

This will be followed our own set of proposed actions for the next Government to put into place in its first 100 days.